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Kill Switch and Lanyard

gso480jr

Well-known member
JAMES said:
ID SO NO SHOULDENT BE A LAW BUT IF U WANT TO ADD ONE FINE .... IF IT WAS THE LAW TO HAVE IT OK I NO FOR A FACT MOST WOULDENT USE IT .. SO DONT MATTER TO ME HELL CANT BE NO WORSE THEN THE MUFFLER LAW ECTECT WHATS NEXT ARE WE GONNA HAVE TO WEAR THEM BIG ASS ORANGE LIFT VEST SO THE BASS BOATS AND JET SKIS CAN SEE US SINCE THEY ARE RIDING WHERE A FLAG FOR THEM ISENT REQUIRED :shock:
i like that james. should start a post on jetski guys that we almost ran over. :lol:
 

Swampsaver

Well-known member
DOI has a good idea. I have seen or been in situations where the operator was tossed from the boat or a throttle became jammed and a kill switch would have helped out a lot. It needs to be tied into the fuel pump and ignition to ensure the engine stops. Some boats have aircraft engines with a mechanical fuel pump and will continue to run on mags even with no power. It only stops when the mags are grounded out. (am I right on that term?).

SS
 

Whitebear

Silent Prop
R. I. P.
You are 100% right. In the case of an aircraft engine the key needs to open the mag ground lead, when you pull it out the contacts then ground the mag.

There is also a fuel shutoff in the mixture control on the carb which "could" be activated by a solenoid when the key is removed.

Lot of work in setting this up, but it "could" be done.
 
saw this late after the comments had run dry but i thought my 2 cents worthy of saying, their value being what y'all pay for them.
there are a thousand different scenarios able to be played out when an airboat operator is ejected from his seat, none are able to be monday quarterbacked worth considering because if you ain't there you don't have a clue what happened, or why, and the only way it could be avoided is by staying home and not getting in your boat. airboating is dangerous sport, sitting 3 feet from a 7 foot potato chopper spinning over 1000 rpms is not like sitting on the couch watching a reality show on tv. we could all argue pros and cons about a kill switch till we yawned but, here is the bottom line. do not, i repeat do not allow the government their 2 cents on the issue. fight tooth and nail for the right to determine for yourself what makes you safe in your airboat, not some federal or state swish who believes one size fits all is the answer to everything because they work for the government and they know what is best for you. they don't and never will. if you think a kill switch should be there, then put it on. if you think it shouldn't, then keep it off. but if the government wants to stick its ugly head into it, then chop it off (figuratively speaking of course). if you don't the day will come when they will be telling you airboats are to dangerous to operate and for your own good we have to take them away from you. if you don't think this to be true, then consider the circumstances with our rights as americans to own a gun, under assault at every turn.
bayouthunder has spoken

:texas:
 

Rich Andrews

Well-known member
Sorry,but I don't buy the or subscribe to the kill switch.....I own an airboat and flats both BOTH equiped with a lanyard. I absolutely use it on my flats boat especially when I'm running alone.

On my airboat last thing I want is to have my airboat shut down,and jeopardize my passengers should I be thrown,you see my flats boat will stay afloat no matter what......period. My airboat can sink,or roll over should power be killed without me being in the seat.

It does no good on dry ground to have a kill lanyard.......and I keep an eye on my return springs. THose pesky coiled up lanyard strings somehow seem to get caught up on things never imagined.....can't tell you how many times it's been coiled up in my steering wheel on my flats boat.

Never seen or heard a boat get stuck WOT,and not seen a driver not be able to pull back on her......but i'm sure its happened
 

SafetyFirst

Well-known member
bayouthunder: The US Government is not even trying to legislate any safety controls for Airboats. DOI has already suffered multiple deaths due to a power boat accident back in the early 1990's and they are simply mandating to their employees a "safer" way to operate Airboats with the "kill switch" policy. If it does prevent a fatality, then DOI has done their job. Powerboats are the same way. Fall from a powerboat and you are likely to get hit by the motor as it turns under torque (and they DO). DOI sure does not want that to happen either. We are just trying everything we can do to prevent a fatality. PS: So far...it has worked! The State of New York has a mandatory PFD Law in effect (only for hypothermic conditions), but I can tell you that when the winter months statistics come in, they WILL see a dramatic reduction in deaths that result from this law. I suspect it won't be long before other states join in and save lives...I can't argue with that either. Safety is important, no matter what type of "craft" you operate.
 

Robert644

Member
Please note that this law does not apply to any boat built before Jan 1, 2020. If the boat already has the switch you are required to use it. It does not apply to landing operations.
 
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